Routledge

Additional Material
for Key Chapters

Chapter 4: Expansion and Flowering

representation of Mughal emperor and Safavid Shah

Allegorical representation of Mughal Emperor Jahangir and the Safavid Shah ‘Abbas of Persia, Mughal, ca. 1618. Courtesy of Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.: Purchase, F1945.9a

  1. Note the sense of confidence, stability and dominance (Literally “on top of the world, looking down on creation”, cf. the last paragraph on p. 50 of Introducing Islam.)
  2. Immediate political import is that the Mughal Emperor claims dominance over Safavids, as can be seen be the relative size of the figures and position of lion and lamb
  3. Western influence may be seen in the cherubs and perhaps in the lion and lamb.
  4. This expresses the attitude of the elite; the general public probably would not have had much occasion to see this picture.

Allegorical representation of Mughal Emperor Jahangir and the Safavid Shah ‘Abbas of Persia, Mughal, ca. 1618. Courtesy of Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.: Purchase, F1945.9a

 

We read a lot about violence between Muslims and Christians in places such as Indonesia and various parts of Africa, as well as between Muslim and Hindus in South Asia. In fact, Muslim and others have often lived quite peacefully together and even shared each others’ feasts and shrines.

For an example of a modern version of this in Senegal, see “A joyeux Noël in Muslim Senegal” by Claire Soares, in The Christian Science Monitor, December 20, 2006: http://www.csmonitor.com/2006/1220/p07s02-woaf.html

© William Shepard

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