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Chapter 3: Prosperity and Wealth Arrive: Boom Times and Women’s Suffrage in the 1920s

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Figure 3.1
Ads like this one emphasized the possibility of middle-class status through consumption. Image from June 1925 issue of Motion Picture courtesy of University of Southern California Cinematic Arts Library.
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Figure 3.2
Despite more professional opportunities for women, ads continually warned that failure to continually monitor one’s body would lead to loneliness. Image from July 1925 issue of Photoplay courtesy of University of Southern California Cinematic Arts Library.
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Figure 3.3
Men were also warned by advertisers to monitor their bodies, and that they would be to blame for lack of success if they failed to do so. Image from June 1922 issue of Picture Play courtesy of University of Southern California Cinematic Arts Library.
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Figure 3.4
Women’s burgeoning independence was often described as threatening in articles like this one from the December 1927 issue of Motion Picture Classic. Image courtesy of University of Southern California Cinematic Arts Library.
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Figure 3.5
Ads admonished women that ignoring domestic chores could lead to loneliness. Image from the February 1928 issue of Motion Picture courtesy of University of Southern California Cinematic Arts Library.
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Figure 3.6
As women gained new freedom and wore less restrictive clothing, ads like these emphasized the importance of being thin. Image from the June 1925 issue of Photoplay courtesy of University of Southern California Cinematic Arts Library.
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